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“The “result” of life is death, so when you create, the importance is not on the result but on the process of creating in and of itself.” - Dean Cavanagh

Things around us are keep changing. And it is quite easy to see the results. But that process, which basically leads to the results, is often overlooked. We can't clearly realize it, because sometimes the change is too fast and sometimes it’s too slow, and usually it happens only one time.

So, in this exhibition, I focus on the process. I create a room, in which a kinetic process is constantly repeated, so visitors can have a clear recognition of it.
 

In our daily life, there are many things related to “process”. As time goes by constantly, the same moment will never come back. Every single moment includes change, be it even very little.
Weather, temperature etc, are different every day, every minute or even every second. The same even holds for people. And “change” is not only limited to living nature. Desks and chairs, which we touch every day, or even the pen, which you have in your hand right now, are in constant process and change as well. They were made somewhere in this world, later bought somewhere else by someone, carried, worn and sometimes dropped, get scratched…and so on. Changes, which nevertheless are human related.

In my installation, the process of change is put in the foreground and at the same time dragged into an endless repetition, inducing a different perception of time.

It consists of at least four sets of a man-size spool and a rotating rectangular frame (2x1.5 m), which in constant movement are reeled on and off with a mirror surfaced rubber band. The band moving between them is controlled by a pole, giving it a guide while continuously changing its height.

Sometimes the frame is all uncovered and allows you to look through, with the spool, covered by the band, reaching its maximum expansion. In the other state, the frame transforms to a closed wall, covered with a random pattern of mirroring band. Winding and rewinding the spool/frame will each take around 3 min.

The units are placed in the same distance from each other. Because of the rotation of the walls and their changing extension, you have to find the right moment to find a passage between, sometimes your way is even blocked. Also, when the walls become bigger and thicker while they rotate, the passages between them become narrower. So with his possible or impossible movements the visitor will become a part of the installation
With the mirror coverings the walls also reflect the room and the visitors around. But the mirror band winds around the frame in an irregular pattern. It does not reflect like a normal mirror, and instead deforms and fragments its surroundings. Someone standing in front of the object can see his own figure only in an alienated way. These irregular visual effects contrast with the mirror frame’s regularly spinning movement. In this configuration the visitors can recognize not only the wall spinning process but also the waiting moment itself.

The rotating and changing mirrors of the installation have another effect: it can easily adapt to different environments and is even designed to interact with various spaces and surroundings. It can be placed both inside and outside, reflecting and interfering with our daily lives. The immediate environment becomes part of it. Even if you choose to put it in an inside room, it may reflect the outside from the window. Wandering through the installation, the division between inside and outside gets blurred.

The installation draws the visitor into another “time space”. It resorbs elements of the outer space with its standardized, linear time regime and transfers them into a repetitive yet constantly changing process, replacing our normal perception of time by a circular, ever changing movement without beginning and ending.