berlin linie

berlin linie
berlin linie
berlin linie
berlin linie
In the summer of 2001 I started my diploma project with the aim to show the city I live in via photographs in order to try to discover the true nature of such a space in pictures.
The points I thought needed consideration were the following: I wanted to show Berlin«s diverse city spaces but I also wanted to show the people living in such spaces. I also wanted to visualise the change in the city and it«s inhabitants ten years after reunification, that is to say, the change in the city but also the change at the city«s borders, which I presumed were becoming less and less easily definable.
I chose a structure I thought suited such a project. Using architectual tools such as the axis and the elevation I decided to cut a line from one side of Berlin to the other. Due to the city«s specific East/West history, I drew this line from west to east rather than north to south or any other possibility. This line, which runs directly through the middle of the city, has two functions. Firstly it served as my path along which I would walk up and down the whole summer long. It also served as the elevation of the city, which means I always directed my camera to the north of the line to create a real side-on view of Berlin. To reduce the project to a reasonable size I decided to only show one image per kilometer, 48km and therefore 48 photos in total.
Before I started taking the photos I decided to use a square format in order to show the background sufficiently. I also decided to photograph in the daytime and to flash all people photographed in order to highlight detail. After the first couple of days I realised that the images worked better outside, always showing people and showing them from head to foot. Later on I moved my camera somewhat closer to accentuate the person rather than the background.
With this tight and rigid structure that almost felt pre-programmed, each day«s work turned out to be surprisingly different. There were days where nothing worked, where nobody wanted to listen or be photographed and then there were the good days. Each meeting was different, sometimes the photo was taken after a very long chat, sometimes before we had hardly spoken to one another. The images were taken of people either in their private property or at their work place, or on the street where they were taking a walk or going shopping.